How to Surface and Align Team Values

Surface and Align Team Values

These questions and guidelines will help you surface the right values for your team. Team values don’t need to be exactly the same as your company values, as long as they are aligned and don’t conflict.

What values are needed to fulfill your team’s purpose?

Values drive purpose. First identify your team’s purpose. Ask, why does your team exist? What is the real service you provide to the company? What business are you really in?

Once you are clear about your team’s purpose, then identify the values needed to fulfill its purpose. Purpose answers why. Values answer how. They provide guidelines for decisions and daily behavior that will help fulfill your purpose.

Your values depend on how you see the purpose of your team. . . . → Read More: How to Surface and Align Team Values

To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose

“Vision is a clearly articulated, results-oriented picture of a future you intend to create. It is a dream with direction.” In short, vision is a combination of three basic elements: 1) a significant purpose, reason for existence, 2) a clear picture of the future, and 3) the underlying core values.

In my last two posts, I discussed the elements of purpose and picture of the future. This post focuses on the third element – values.

Our values are our deeply held beliefs about what is right and good, evoking standards that we care deeply about. They drive our behaviors and decisions, trigger our emotions, and can fuel a passion that drives commitment, even in the face of obstacles and change.

An engaging vision, one . . . → Read More: To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose

Are You Consciously (or Unconsciously) Values-Driven?

Ashleigh Brilliant Values

 

To live intentionally, you must surface your values – not the ones you think you should have, but the ones you really do have.

Our values are our deeply held beliefs about what is right and good.

Values drive our behaviors, whether we are conscious of them or not.

Many people adopt the values articulated by their parents, organizations or institutions. But when they are not also conscious of their own personal values and the connection between their values and what they espouse, they are often only superficially committed to them. The values support a self-image of who they want to be, not necessarily who they are, and don’t hold up during times of stress. This is one of the reasons we . . . → Read More: Are You Consciously (or Unconsciously) Values-Driven?

Without Clear Values, You Are Probably Losing Business

Can everyone in your organization explain each of the values and how they personally act on them? They can at companies like Disney, Starbucks, Southwest, McDonalds and Google – all listed in the top 15 of the 2012 most admired companies. . . . → Read More: Without Clear Values, You Are Probably Losing Business

5 Pitfalls to Avoid When Identifying Team Values

What Happened:

Someone on the leadership team suggested it would be a good idea to identify our values. The regular agenda for the leadership team meetings was already jam-packed, and no one had time for an extra meeting to do this work, so the task was assigned to a few volunteers to bring back to the team.

The Pitfall:

Seeing values as separate from the real work. The leaders delegated and disengaged. By taking the time as a team to discuss what values they believed were critical to their future, they would have discovered how these values drive the very behaviors they need to accomplish the work. The sub-group members understood it was not a good . . . → Read More: 5 Pitfalls to Avoid When Identifying Team Values

Characteristics of an Effective Vision: Create a DRIVING Vision

In Full Steam Ahead! Unleash the Power of Vision, we provide this definition of vision:

“Vision is knowing who you are, where you’re going, and what will guide the journey.” – Ken Blanchard and Jesse Lyn Stoner

A much earlier definition I wrote is quoted by Zig Ziglar in Over the Top:

“A vision is a clearly-articulated, results-oriented picture of a future you intend to create. It is a dream with direction.” – Jesse Stoner-Zemel

Both definitions are accurate, but to more fully explain the characteristics of an effective vision – a vision that drives commitment and direction – I use the acronym DRIVING. It helps avoid ending up with something that is so vague or lofty, it has no meaning. . . . → Read More: Characteristics of an Effective Vision: Create a DRIVING Vision

Lessons from the Costa Concordia: A Case For Company Values

The events before, during and after the January 13 tragedy aboard the Costa Concordia point to a true failure of leadership at every level, from the captain who ran the luxury liner aground during a drive by “salute” off the island of Isola del Giglio to the chief executive Pier Luigi Foschi who denies any responsibility. Two days ago Foschi told a newspaper they were unaware of this practice.

Why didn’t they know?

What was operating in the culture of the company that would give rise to these dangerous practices and where senior leaders were disconnected? Curious what company values were driving these behaviors, I searched the Costa Cruises website.

The week of the accident, these values were listed on their website:

Passion for our . . . → Read More: Lessons from the Costa Concordia: A Case For Company Values

Vision Statements That Work: The Long and Short of It

How long should your vision statement be?

The answer: Long enough.

Long enough to evoke a noble sense of purpose, provide a call to action, and describe a clear picture of your destination.

These four vision statements work because they condense a lot of information into an inspiring statement that is quickly understood by most people. If you were not familiar with the context, it would require a much longer statement to explain them.

xxxxxxxxA computer on every desk. ~Steve Jobs

xxxxxxxxA computer on every desk in every home running Microsoft software. ~Bill Gates

xxxxxxxxProduce an affordable automobile. ~Henry Ford

xxxxxxxxOne team, one country. ~Nelson Mandela

HOWEVER…most effective vision statements are NOT short statements.

Consider Martin Luther . . . → Read More: Vision Statements That Work: The Long and Short of It

The Key to Visions That Work

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What makes a vision work? Why do some visions galvanize people toward great achievement while others cause your eyes to glaze over?

What all great visions have in common is they provide an answer to these three questions:

1) Destination: Where are we going?

2) Purpose: Why do we exist? What greater good do we serve?

3) Values: What principles guide our decisions and actions on our journey?

When a vision address all three of these questions, a tremendous amount of energy is unleashed. There is a higher level of commitment because employees are able to see the relationship between the direction of their company and what they personally believe in and care deeply . . . → Read More: The Key to Visions That Work