Mindfulness in the Workplace Is More than Meditation

Be Curious

In a recent Huffington Post article, Ford Motor Company chairman Bill Ford and former Google.org director Larry Brilliant are described as “business leaders who advocate mindfulness.” The article then goes on to list ten executives who meditate regularly. It’s easy to assume mindfulness and meditation are the same. No wonder there’s confusion.

With the increased interest in mindfulness in the workplace, many companies now offer classes in yoga, meditation, and stress reduction, and endorse activities such as spending 5 minutes each day doing nothing and taking time out for reflective reading.

These are all excellent activities, but they will not automatically create mindfulness.

Mindfulness is a way of being, not an activity.

Mindfulness is the practice of being fully present with the experience of . . . → Read More: Mindfulness in the Workplace Is More than Meditation

Could You Be Off Course Without Knowing It?

Unaware off course

You’re clear about where you want to go. You made your plans. You’ve started on your journey.

Maybe you landed your dream job, or found your soulmate, or have a vision for how you can make a difference in the world.

So now, you simply need to focus on execution – on implementing your plans. Right?

Wrong!

Sadly, it’s not uncommon that at some point in the future, you might take stock and wonder how you ended up where you are.

Why does that happen? How is it possible to be off course without knowing it?

1. A huge, sudden external shift.

A sudden change in your world can derail you, not just temporarily, but for long after the crisis is over.

Anthony had just . . . → Read More: Could You Be Off Course Without Knowing It?

Craft Workplace Inspiration With an Organizational Constitution

Culture Engine Cover

Guest post by S. Chris Edmonds

How is your team or department performing today?

I’ll bet you think you know how your team is performing. Most likely you have dashboards that indicate production, error rates, profitability, sales, market share, and more.

You probably also have customer service metrics at your fingertips – tools that indicate service ratings, customer satisfaction, customer churn, and the like.

But do you know exactly how inspiring your work environment is?

Performance, customer service, and workplace inspiration are all equally important metrics.

The reality is that workplace inspiration isn’t closely monitored, measured, or rewarded. Very few leaders pay attention to it. And if they do notice it – and notice that workplace inspiration isn’t where they’d like it . . . → Read More: Craft Workplace Inspiration With an Organizational Constitution

The Art of Hosting Meaningful Meetings

Another Unproductive Meeting

Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone thanked you at the end of the meeting and told you how glad they were to have been there?

How likely is that to happen?

A recent study found that for the second year in a row, workers reported meetings as “the biggest distraction and waste of time presented by the workplace.”

Did you know that time spent in meetings has skyrocketed? Harvard Business Review reports leaders spend more than two days a week in meetings, an amount that has increased every year since 2008.

Recently I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Kevin Eikenberry for his “Remarkable Leadership Online Seminar” about how to host productive meetings. We had a lively conversation which you can listen to . . . → Read More: The Art of Hosting Meaningful Meetings

Forget the Bus! Develop Talent to Create a Fast, Nimble Fleet

Bus

Organizations need people who know what they’re doing, where they’re going, and have the skills to get there. We call that “talent.”

Unfortunately, there’s a common misbelief that the best way to get talent is to buy it – not build it – by ranking everyone, eliminating those at the bottom and hiring new people to replace them.

This approach was first popularized in the 1980’s by Jack Welch at GE and was reinforced in 2001 by Jim Collins who told us to “get the right people on the bus and the wrong people off.”

By 2012, 60% of Fortune 500 firms were using some type of ranking system – with dubious results. Vanity Fair contributing editor Kurt Eichenwald blamed Microsoft’s stack ranking system for . . . → Read More: Forget the Bus! Develop Talent to Create a Fast, Nimble Fleet

The New Rules of the Social Age

The Social Age

Guest Post by Ted Coiné, Co-author A World Gone Social

What used to seem very good leadership practices in the Industrial Age was good, or at least efficient. But the Industrial Age is over. And it’s not coming back. It’s the Social Age now, and it will be for quite some time to come.

New age, New rules.

We humans are social down to our very core – it’s not just what we do, it’s what we are. Connecting with each other, sharing ideas, news, tips – and sometimes warnings – that’s all we’ve ever done. First our connecting was limited to the physical proximity of our tribe or village. Then letters tied us one by one over distances, then phone lines did; . . . → Read More: The New Rules of the Social Age

Social Media Has Redefined Breaking News - For Me Forever

We moved from New England to the San Francisco Bay Area in the end of July. Three weeks later, I was awakened in the middle of the night by the largest earthquake in 25 years.

It felt like the house was right next to a train track and a train was going by. The vibration lasted about a minute and then stopped as suddenly as it had started. No one else in my house stirred, not even the dog. So it couldn’t be too serious, right?

Out of curiosity, I rolled over and typed “san francisco earthquake” on my smartphone. To my astonishment, an announcement popped up “San Francisco Earthquake 6.0 Magnitude – 2 minutes ago.”

People who live in California are used to earthquakes, . . . → Read More: Social Media Has Redefined Breaking News – For Me Forever

How to Identify Team Values that Unify and Guide Your Team

Identify Team Values That Unify Your Team

When you agree on your team values, you increase trust and create a language for more effectively working together.

Values are deeply held beliefs about what is right and good and evoke standards that you care deeply about. They drive your behaviors and decisions.

Most often your values influence your behavior unconsciously. High performance teams are clear about their values and consciously make decisions based on them.

If your organization has published values, it is still helpful to identify the values that are specific to the needs and purpose of your team. It’s okay if they are not the same, as long as they are aligned and don’t conflict.

If your organization has not articulated values, it is even more important to identify your . . . → Read More: How to Identify Team Values that Unify and Guide Your Team

Organizational Change Can Start Wherever You Are

Ripple Effect

Do you wish senior leaders would make some changes in your organization? Instead of waiting and wishing for someone from above to provide leadership, you can make a significant impact no matter what your role is.

According to Steven Covey said, “Most people think of leadership as a position and therefore don’t see themselves as leaders.”

The assumption that organizational change has to start at the top is wrong.

Peter Senge says to “give up traditional notions that visions are always announced from ‘on high’ or come from an organization’s institutionalized planning process.”

Michael Beer of Harvard Business School agrees. “Managers don’t have to wait for senior management to start a process of organizational revitalization.”

You might be wondering, “How can I change my organization . . . → Read More: Organizational Change Can Start Wherever You Are