4 Ways Leadership Drift Can Catch You Unaware

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Are you enthusiastic about your work? When you reflect on your day at work, do you feel a deep sense of satisfaction? Is the person you are at work the same as the person you are outside of work?

If the answer to any of these questions is “no,” it’s possible you might be caught in leadership drift. You might have heard about team drift, where teams lose their focus without realizing it. The same thing can happen to individuals.

You might be adrift without realizing it.

Why Leadership Drift Occurs A huge external shift

You might have been thrown off track initially because of something huge like a hurricane or a serious illness, and by the time the dust settled, you forgot . . . → Read More: 4 Ways Leadership Drift Can Catch You Unaware

3 Powerful Questions To Start and End Your Day

PowerQuestions

Your questions determine the quality of your answers. They determine the quality of your day. A good question will get you a lot farther than a quick answer.

Powerful Morning Questions

Start your day with focus and energy by taking a few moments to answer these questions.

1. What will give me joy today?

2. What am I excited about accomplishing today?

3. Who needs my help today?

Powerful Evening Questions

Your day will take on greater meaning and will end on a better note if you take a few moments to answer these questions before you go to sleep.

1. What am I proud of?

2. Who do I love?

. . . → Read More: 3 Powerful Questions To Start and End Your Day

The 9 Essential Leadership Strategies in The Age of Information

Ages

Once upon a time, in a land called Industrial Age, the leaders of organizations resided at the top of a hierarchy, managers were in the middle, and workers were supervised.

It was the job of leaders to do the important thinking and the job of managers and supervisors to make sure it was implemented.

Because no one cared what the managers, supervisors and workers thought, many of them parked their brains at the door as they came to work.

Others only used part of their brains, limiting their focus to implementation without regard for the impact on the larger organization.

Eventually the companies became gunked up. They were not healthy places for people. and their long-term results did not reach their potential.

Because their life . . . → Read More: The 9 Essential Leadership Strategies in The Age of Information

How to Change Someone Who Doesn't Want to Change

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Strong Leaders Ask For Help

Asking For Help When You Need It

If you are in a leadership role, chances are you believe it’s better to give than to receive.

Which means you also probably believe you should

… always be competent

… never make mistakes

… always be strong

and that you should only receive when you have something to give in return.

The problem with this attitude is that when you are in a situation where you don’t have a choice and must receive, you are likely to feel

… humiliated

… incompetent

… stupid

We hear “it’s better to give than to receive” but the truth is:

It’s easier to give than to receive, but not always better.

Giving when people can help themselves takes away their power and opportunity to grow, and . . . → Read More: Strong Leaders Ask For Help

Small Companies Need Clear Values

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Springtime reminds me of fruit trees and the power of values-driven companies – or more accurately – the cost of NOT being one.

Small companies often think they don’t need to bother with things like mission and values – that those are things for large companies. Big mistake.

It’s why our tree service company lost our business.

They were very nice people, dependable and a good price. But they did not communicate guiding values to their employees, and one of them endangered my son’s health. That was a show-stopper.

Here’s what happened.

One lovely spring afternoon, one of the technicians stopped by unexpectedly to spray our fruit trees. The contact allowed them to come without calling first, which normally would not be a . . . → Read More: Small Companies Need Clear Values

Collaboration Does Not Require Consensus: Team Decision-Making is Situational

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There are six ways teams can make decisions. Some people believe that in a collaborative environment, consensus is the best. But that’s a big mistake.

Pushing for consensus when it’s not needed actually makes collaboration more difficult. The best collaborative environments are situational in their approach to team decision-making.

You make countless decisions every day. Knowing when and how you need to involve others, and the best team decision-making method for each situation, will help you make the right decisions, will make implementation easier and will save time in the long run.

The Six Types of Team Decisions

Individual. The individual who is responsible for the outcome makes the decision. If your office is running low on pens, the office manager can decide . . . → Read More: Situational Team Decision-Making: Collaboration Does Not Require Consensus

Why Nobody Noticed You Changed and 5 Things You Can Do To Make Change Stick

Personal transformatio

Did you ever get feedback that your behavior was having a negative impact on others? Perhaps you were told you’re too critical… or don’t listen enough… or are micro-managing your team… or even the other end – that you’re not involved enough?

Have you ever worked hard to change that behavior, perhaps even worked with a coach, but then got feedback that they still saw you as a frog… not the prince or princess you thought you had become?

If so, you’ve not alone. One of the most common reasons people revert to old behavior patterns is because of lack of appreciation of their efforts, lack of acknowledgement they’ve changed, and lack of support to continue acting differently.

No wonder “change doesn’t stick.”

Why . . . → Read More: Why Nobody Noticed You Changed and 5 Things You Can Do To Make Change Stick

Vision and Execution Are Not Sequential

Circular

One of the biggest mistakes leaders make is moving from vision to execution as though it’s a linear process. The widely held assumption is they are two ends of a spectrum: Vision is about planning. Execution is about action.

The truth is: Vision requires action to be clarified and refined, and execution requires reflection to be effective.

IT’S NOT LINEAR

Most leadership experts subscribe to some variation of these five steps. The model is logical. But in reality, most of us don’t live our lives that way, and most leaders are not rigorous about it, because life doesn’t wait while you are planning. No wonder so many leaders have little patience with the first steps.

CIRCULAR IS BETTER

When you think of these steps as . . . → Read More: Vision and Execution Are Not Sequential