Stay Focused on Your Vision

"The path might not be clear, but stay focused on your vision and take the first step. The journey is as important as the destination." ~ Jesse Lyn Stoner

Stay focused on your vision and take the first step.

What I Learned about Vision Casting

Guest Post by Dan Rockwell @LeadershipFreak (Jedi Master of leadership lessons in less than 300 words)

I thought vision casting was about me. Jesse Lyn Stoner taught me that vision is about us.

I used to craft the vision and spring it on my team. I’d declare, “Here’s where we’re going.”

It’s the only model I ever saw.

Casting vision as a solo act reflects top-down, disconnected leadership. In the end, it isn’t leadership at all. It’s declaration.

Vision that’s about us takes

openness,

courage,

candor,

transparency, and

flexibility.

The declarative approach is easier at first, but ineffective in the long run.

I haven’t fully learned the lesson. I still . . . → Read More: What I Learned about Vision Casting

An Interview with Jake Jacobs on Real Time Strategic Change

RTSC Jake Jacobs Webinar

I was delighted to catch up with Jake Jacobs, the creator of Real Time Strategic Change (RTSC), the approach that brings hundreds of people together to make collaborative decisions about their organization in real time, which I described in Try Collaborative Change for a Change.

I had an opportunity to ask Jake about how change has changed since he first developed RTSC. Jesse: Jake, you wrote the first edition of your groundbreaking book Real Time Strategic Change twenty years ago. I’ve used RTSC many times over the years and am always impressed with what happens when you bring a large slice of an organization together to discuss issues and make decisions instead of putting them in an auditorium to be talked at by the . . . → Read More: An Interview with Jake Jacobs on Real Time Strategic Change

Tune In and Turn Off

In Balance

Just because technology makes it possible to be always available, doesn’t mean you should be.

There’s tremendous pressure on us to be “always on.” But it’s not healthy, and in the long run you will be less productive.

Even if you understand this, it can be hard to resist the pressure unless you make intentional decisions to create “off time.”

Here are 7 habits that can help.

1. Stop multi-tasking. Many people view the ability to multi-task as an admirable skill. They believe they are able to accomplish more. But studies have shown that you actually accomplish less and do it less well. The illusion of productivity comes at the expense of performance effectiveness. The less you multi-task, the less you’ll be tempted to . . . → Read More: Tune In and Turn Off

How to REALLY Listen

Mime Listening

My friend Jake said, “When someone tells me about a problem, I used to try to help them solve it. But I’ve learned that simply listening can be more helpful than the best advice I might give.”

Jake is not alone. Many of us equate listening with problem-solving, and we don’t even realize it. We believe that when someone shares a problem, the best response is to help them find a solution.

Do you know how to REALLY listen? … to listen without feeling responsible to help the person find a solution?

The REAL listening skills.

Some years ago during a YPO Forum moderators training program, one of the participants had this explanation of the power of real listening faxed from his office. I’ve . . . → Read More: How to REALLY Listen

Results Driven vs Process Driven Leadership

Results Driven vs Process Driven

During a break in the meeting, Dan pulled me aside and whispered, “No more ‘p’ words, please.”

“What are ‘p’ words?” I asked.

“You know,” he replied, “Words like process, perspective and paradigm.”

Dan is results-driven. There were way too many “p” words in this meeting for his comfort … planning … process … people … participation.

At one time or another, many of us have felt like Dan – that it is so much easier to do the work than take the time to involve others in the process of planning for the work – to just decide where you’re going and get on with it.

The problem is, when you’re a leader, you can’t just announce where you’re going and expect people . . . → Read More: Results Driven vs Process Driven Leadership

TweetChat: An Exciting New Way to Learn, Connect, and Explore Emergent Leadership

IndiaHRChat

I had the honor of being invited to guest host the India HR Twitter Chat this past week, with two of my favorite leadership experts Tanmay Vora and Tanvi Guatam. The #IndiaHRChat is attended by many experienced business leaders and HR professionals who tackle meaty issues around leadership.

The topic for this Chat was “Emergent Leadership”.

In the India HR Chat Preview, the questions that would be asked during the chat were listed and also articles for pre-reading, including First Fire All the Managers by Gary Hamel and Emergent Leadership Topples the Pyramid by Jesse Stoner.

No More Long Lectures – A Different Way to Learn

A “TweetChat” itself is a most unusual form of conversation. From the outside – and even from the inside . . . → Read More: TweetChat: An Exciting New Way to Learn, Connect, and Explore Emergent Leadership

Create a Team Charter to Go Faster and Smarter

Team Charter Diagram

Victor’s team had recently delivered a couple of large projects, and he was pleased with their performance. But there was feedback that they were feeling burned out, and two people had recently requested transfers.

When I suggested creating a Team Charter, he told me, “Planning is fine, but I’m all about action. I’d rather see people take action and feel ownership than set up a bunch of rules that slow things down.”

Is Victor right? Absolutely!

When people initiate action, they assume greater responsibility for ensuring a successful outcome.

Is Victor wrong? Absolutely!

When people take random action without clear agreements with others, they are likely to waste their time and other’s as well.

Here’s the paradox:

. . . → Read More: Create a Team Charter to Go Faster and Smarter

The Best Way to Predict Your Future

Newscast

“The best way to predict your future is to create it.” – This popular quote is attributed to Peter Drucker. But what does it really mean?

Do you muscle your way into the future, constructing your life as though it’s a project? If you try to do that, you’ll be disappointed.

The real meaning behind this statement is that we need to assume responsibility for our lives and the future we want to impact.

It starts with focusing on the reality you create right now, which is shaped by what you focus your attention on and the images you hold in your mind.

Advanced studies in neuroscience show that we are hard-wired to focus on negative images. When we see something beautiful, we notice . . . → Read More: The Best Way to Predict Your Future