Tune In and Turn Off

In Balance

Just because technology makes it possible to be always available, doesn’t mean you should be.

There’s tremendous pressure on us to be “always on.” But it’s not healthy, and in the long run you will be less productive.

Even if you understand this, it can be hard to resist the pressure unless you make intentional decisions to create “off time.”

Here are 7 habits that can help.

1. Stop multi-tasking. Many people view the ability to multi-task as an admirable skill. They believe they are able to accomplish more. But studies have shown that you actually accomplish less and do it less well. The illusion of productivity comes at the expense of performance effectiveness. The less you multi-task, the less you’ll be tempted to . . . → Read More: Tune In and Turn Off

The Best Way to Predict Your Future

Newscast

“The best way to predict your future is to create it.” – This popular quote is attributed to Peter Drucker. But what does it really mean?

Do you muscle your way into the future, constructing your life as though it’s a project? If you try to do that, you’ll be disappointed.

The real meaning behind this statement is that we need to assume responsibility for our lives and the future we want to impact.

It starts with focusing on the reality you create right now, which is shaped by what you focus your attention on and the images you hold in your mind.

Advanced studies in neuroscience show that we are hard-wired to focus on negative images. When we see something beautiful, we notice . . . → Read More: The Best Way to Predict Your Future

A tweet, a blog post, and a profound teaching

Twitter

 

What’s the best length for a blog post? Mine are usually between 500 to 800 words.

However, through the discipline of writing tweets, I have discovered that it is quite possible to communicate an important concept in 160 characters or less.

 

A Talmudic Tweet

There is a story from the 1st century BCE that tells of a non-Jew who came to the rabbinic sage Hillel. He said that he would convert if the rabbi would teach him the Torah while standing on one leg. Rabbi Hillel replied, “That which is hateful to you, do not unto another: This is the whole of Torah. The rest is commentary. Now go study.”

In less than 120 characters (a tweet!), Rabbi Hillel explained the essence . . . → Read More: A tweet, a blog post, and a profound teaching

9 Tips to Increase the Likelihood You'll Be Heard

You don't need a megaphone to be heard

 

Did you ever have an important point to make that wasn’t heard or understood? What did you do? If you eventually gave up in frustration, you’re not unusual.

When you have something important to say, a little preparation ahead of time can increase the likelihood you’ll be heard.

Here are 9 tips to increase the likelihood you’ll be heard the first time:

Use “I statements.” Take personal ownership for the ideas and feelings you express. When you use terms like “some people” or “our group,” it is difficult to tell what you really think and feel or whether you are just repeating the thoughts and feelings of others. Provide the context. Explain your intention in communicating, what you hope will happen as . . . → Read More: 9 Tips to Increase the Likelihood You’ll Be Heard

The 12 Skills of Brilliant Team Members

Brilliant stars

When Casey got the award at the annual meeting, no one was surprised. He was a marketing genius, and his team’s success was unparalleled in the history of the company. He was clearly a rising star.

The problem was, his fellow team members thought he was a pain in the neck. He wasn’t a team player, he didn’t share information and he kept recognition for himself.

Although aware of Casey’s lack of team skills, senior management was pleased with the results he delivered, and they were afraid that expecting him to be a team player would dampen his brilliance.

They were wrong.

A team can have both brilliant players and great teamwork… if the team is not built around an individual, if team-oriented behaviors are . . . → Read More: The 12 Skills of Brilliant Team Members

How Yoga Principles Bring Sanity to Your Work Life

Did you know that yoga is about more than just stretching and putting your body in poses? In fact, physical activity is just one of the Eight Limbs of Yoga.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Maren and Jamie Showkeir, authors of the fascinating new book Yoga Wisdom at Work: Finding Sanity Off the Mat and On the Job. Their book explains how all eight limbs apply to the workplace.

In our 15 minute discussion, we focused on two of the limbs: Universal Morality and Focus. You can hear their views and practical advice on:

How we limit our potential by listening to our inner critic. How small acts of unkindness and disrespect in the workplace erode our power, creativity and productivity. What you . . . → Read More: How Yoga Principles Bring Sanity to Your Work Life

How to Leave Your Job And Keep Your Dignity

How to leave your job and keep your dignity

If you want to quit your job, make sure you don’t leave your dignity behind. How you leave your job who you are and how you feel about yourself.

These 8 suggestions will help you leave on a good note. They won’t guarantee it, because you can’t control other people’s reactions. But even if there is negativity, if you leave with what cultural anthropologist Angeles Arrien calls Honorable Closure, you will be able to feel good about yourself.

1. Do your homework. Before you make the decision to quit, be clear about what your motivation is. Is it because: Career opportunities are limited? There something more attractive elsewhere? This is not the work you want to be doing after all? There is a lack . . . → Read More: How to Leave Your Job And Keep Your Dignity

Why My “5 Around” Group is Important to Me and Why You Should Start One

5 Around, January, 2000

I just arrived in Sarasota, Florida for my 5 Around Retreat. Twenty-three years ago, we began meeting as a group of high level executives and consultants with the intent of using each other as resources to address… . . . → Read More: Why My “5 Around” Group is Important to Me and Why You Should Start One

How To Answer a Wake Up Call

Wake Up Call

The results on her 360 feedback were troubling… for her boss… but apparently not for her. Susan was delivering great results, and she knew it. She had successfully led the effort to launch three new products since she had joined the company two years earlier. Bright, ambitious and well-educated, Susan had a clear career path in the company.

She was surprised her direct reports had rated her so low on empathy, managing emotions and providing feedback, and she reluctantly agreed when her boss suggested she work with a coach.

Susan hit the snooze button on her wake up call.

After a few coaching sessions, Susan decided she was too busy to continue and that she could resolve the issues on her own. Indeed, things did . . . → Read More: How To Answer a Wake Up Call