1001 Mid-Course Corrections

1001 Mid-Course Corrections

I once heard that in order to reach the moon, NASA made over a thousand mid-course corrections.

At first I was surprised. If you know where you’re going, why not just plot the course, like they do on Star Trek?

But then I realized it’s a perfect metaphor for a trap we often fall into when goal-setting.

This 2 minute video explains the trap and how to avoid it:

 

Your vision will expand and become more clear the closer you get to it, but its fundamental essence will not change. Your goals, however, are your steps along the path. As your path is revealed, your goals may need to change.

Waiting for a yearly review of goals does . . . → Read More: 1001 Mid-Course Corrections

Dig Below Your Dreams to Discover Your Vision

Your vision arises from your hopes and dreams. If you’re not clear about what you really want, you are likely to set goals that will not be truly satisfying once accomplished.

Look below the surface to find the roots of your dreams. You might find that what you thought you wanted is actually a symbol of what you truly desire.

Chris said he dreamed of owning a Porsche. Being a “high potential” in the company, he was well on his way to achieving his goal.

In response to questions like “If you had that, then what would you have?” and “Why do you really want that?” Chris responded,

“We didn’t have much money when I was growing up. My dad left when I was really . . . → Read More: Dig Below Your Dreams to Discover Your Vision

Goal Setting for Goallessness

My friend Susan wrote, “Although I am ashamed to admit it….I don’t think I have any goals right now. At least there are none that have crystallized for me. I am a goal-setter, always have been, and have achieved almost all that I have set….

What I am trying to do is feel comfortable being in the moment of my life, my career, my health…I know all too well that none of those important ‘issues’ are unchanging. Tomorrow I may lose my job, my health or even my life. I am unsure of my role in my current job, but at the moment I am enjoying it. So…is it a problem to feel goal-less in my life and career? Am I being less productive than . . . → Read More: Goal Setting for Goallessness

When You're Thrown Off Course...

In 1975, Terry Fox, was awarded Athlete of the Year his senior year in his British Columbia, Canada high school. A few months after graduation, he discovered he had a malignant tumor. His leg was amputated four days later.

The night before his operation, he read a magazine article about an amputee who ran in the New York marathon. That night, Terry dreamed about running across Canada.

During his follow-up treatment, Terry saw suffering as he’d never seen it before. He later wrote these words in a letter to the Canadian Cancer Society requesting their support:

As I went through the sixteen months of the physically and emotionally draining ordeal of chemotherapy, I was rudely awakened by the feelings that surrounded and coursed through the . . . → Read More: When You’re Thrown Off Course…

6 Tips to Set Goals That Will Get You Where You Want to Go

Six Tips to Set Goals That Will Get You Where You Want to Go. Vision is your destination. Goals are the milestones that mark your journey. They quantify and define the steps you take along the way as you go for the gold medal.

Where your vision is broad and big, goals are tangible and specific. They answer questions like “when?’ and “how?” and “how much?” SMART goals are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-bound.

How do you set the right goals and make them work? Here are 6 tips.

1. Keep your vision in mind when setting goals.

Always view your goals in the context of your vision.

Look for high-leverage goals – those that will allow you to leapfrog forward. Also . . . → Read More: 6 Tips to Set Goals That Will Get You Where You Want to Go

Personal Vision: 6 Guidelines to Create a Vision For the Life You Really Want

Why hasn’t my life turned out the way I planned? Twice in one week I heard this exact same question. Both times I was surprised because each accomplished, attractive woman would be considered enviable by most standards.

Michelle’s warm personality and infectious laugh attracts a lot of friends. She has a loving husband, two teenage sons who are honor students and varsity athletes, and on the side, she trains women to run marathons.

Sarah, an executive in a Fortune 1000 company, is one of the elite group of women who inhabit the C-Suite. Intelligent and with a quick-wit, she’s a natural leader.

So what was the problem?

Michelle was disappointed that she hadn’t created the successful career she had envisioned when she was in . . . → Read More: Personal Vision: 6 Guidelines to Create a Vision For the Life You Really Want